Republican Men and Rape

Richard Mourdock, Republican Senate candidate from Indiana, has joined the club of Republican candidates saying really stupid things about rape. His contribution:

“I think even when life begins in that horrible situation of rape, that it is something that God intended to happen.”

Said while debating Democrat Joe Donnelly.

From the Obama campaign:

“This is a reminder that a Republican Congress working with a Republican president Mitt Romney would (feel) that women should not be able to make choices about their own health care,” Obama spokeswoman Jen Psaki said Wednesday morning.

The Republican platform calls for making abortion illegal – including in cases of rape and incest.

Other stupid remarks by Republicans include:

Todd Akin: “If it’s a legitimate rape, the female body has ways of shutting that whole thing down” – mid 2012 Senate Campaign

Rick Santorum: “I think the right approach is to accept this horribly created — in the sense of rape — but nevertheless a gift in a very broken way, the gift of human life, and accept what God has given to you… rape victims should make the best of a bad situation.” – January, 2012

Paul Ryan: “I’m very proud of my pro-life record. I’ve always adopted the idea that the method of conception doesn’t change the definition of life,” said during an interview with television station WJHL.

I, of course, agree with Obama:

“This is exactly why you don’t want a bunch of politicians, mostly male, making decisions about women’s health care decisions,” he told Leno, without mentioning Romney by name. “Women are capable of making these decisions in consultation with their partners, with their doctors, and for politicians to want to intrude in this stuff often times without any information is a huge problem. And this is obviously a part of what’s at stake in this election.”

The Republican candidates have clarified that 1) they don’t understand reproduction and should shut up about it and 2) that their ideas are religiously based and have no place being forced on the population.

If we have freedom of religion – then while Ryan and Mourdock might think that “GOD” intends to create babies through rape, women who believe that “GOD” does not intend any such thing OR who do not believe in “GOD” whatsoever, should not have to be held down by the other’s religious ideas and beliefs.

I don’t think that the Christian Republicans have thought this through. I would be pretty shocked if one of them were to say that “GOD” had a hand in creating the holocaust, for instance. What all horrible things do they think that “GOD” intended to happen. Plus, I’m pretty sure that these Republican Christians would not want to be forced to comply with Muslim (or any other religion’s) laws.

The idea that the intelligent, educated part of the population should be subjugated by the wills of the ignorant, superstitious part (that makes up nonsense to deny women control of their bodies) is absurd.

The Sorry State of Higher Ed

It’s a sad state of affairs for Universities. It used to mean more to be a college professor. Of course that was before women joined the ranks in larger numbers. It’s funny how that works.

From the Homeless Adjunct – snips from  How The American University was Killed, in Five Easy Steps

 

At latest count, we have 1.5 million university professors in this country, 1 million of whom are adjuncts. One million professors in America are hired on short-term contracts, most often for one semester at a time, with no job security whatsoever….

 

…the average yearly starting salary of a university professor at Temple University in 1975 was just under $10,000 a year, with full benefits – health, retirement, and educational benefits (their family’s could attend college for free.) And guess what? Average pay for Temple’s faculty is STILL about the same — because adjuncts now make up the majority of faculty, and earn between $8,000 to $14,000 a year (depending on how many courses they are assigned each semester – there is NO guarantee of continued employment) — but unlike the full-time professors of 1975, these adjunct jobs come with NO benefits, no health care, no retirement, no educational benefits, no offices. How many other professions report salaries that have remained at 1975 levels?

 

…From the 1970s until today, as the number of full-time faculty jobs continued to shrink, the number of full-time administrative jobs began to explode. As faculty was deprofessionalized and casualized, reduced to teaching as migrant contract workers, administrative jobs now offered good, solid salaries, benefits, offices, prestige and power. In 2012, administrators now outnumber faculty on every campus across the country.

 

…There has been a redistribution of funds away from those who actually teach, the scholars – and therefore away from the students’ education itself — and into these administrative and executive salaries, sports costs — and the expanded use of “consultants”, PR and marketing firms, law firms. We have to add here, too, that president salaries went from being, in the 1970s, around $25K to 30K, to being in the hundreds of thousands to MILLIONS of dollars – salary, delayed compensation, discretionary funds, free homes, or generous housing allowances, cars and drivers, memberships to expensive country clubs.

 

…So what is the problem with corporate money, you might ask? A lot. When corporate money floods the universities, corporate values replace academic values. As we said before, humanities get defunded and the business school gets tons of money. Serious issues of ethics begin to develop when corporate money begins to make donations and form partnerships with science departments – where that money buys influence regarding not only the kinds of research being done but the outcomes of that research.

 

…Tuitions have increased, using CA as an example again, over 2000% since the 1970s. 2000%!

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When you know how much tuition has increased and how little adjuncts are paid – you realize how absurd the situation is. I am an adjunct. I will be paid $2500 for teaching over 30 seventy-five minute classes – along with creating/grading tests and papers, etc. What sort of incentive is there for creating more permanent jobs. It will take an informed public to complain – voice their outrage over the situation.